Steele Foundation Donates $250K to Free Arts

New center to serve thousands of additional children and families

The Steele Foundation has donated $250,000 to Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona for its Building Hope Capital Purchase and Renovation Campaign. Free Arts plans to transform the nondescript office building at 352 E. Camelback Road to a modern center for art. The new art room will be named after The Steele Foundation. Studio Ma Architectural & Environment Design will design and oversee the renovatation.

The new center will allow Free Arts to expand programs to serve thousands of additional children and families. The organization will explore and establish best practices for using the arts and mentoring with children who have experienced trauma. The center also will showcase artwork and stories that foster a deeper understanding of children who have experienced the trauma of abuse or homelessness. Free Arts projects that more than 66,000 people will use the renovated building over a 10-year period.

Additionally, the building will allow for program, staff and volunteer growth. It will create a hub where the people and organizations that constitute the child well-being community can come together for learning, knowledge-sharing, creating and program delivery. The new building is set to be complete by February 2020.

RENDERING COURTESY FREE ARTS FOR ABUSED CHILDREN OF ARIZONA

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