Phoenix Boys Choir Gala

‘New Roaring ’20s’ honors Dr. Dorothy Lincoln Smith

In 2019, Phoenix Boys Choir welcomed new leadership. In June, for the first time in 20 years the Choir welcomed a new artistic director,chair

Gala chair Kristine McIver and GayLynn Shea

Herbert Washington, and a new chair of its board of trustees, Brandi Reynolds. In mid-October, the Choir a new executive director, Mitra Khazai, took the helm. In spite of the changes, the organization produced its first gala in several years on Nov. 9.

“The New Roaring ’20s” was held at Hotel Valley Ho. Guests enjoyed entertainment by the choir, along with food, bidding and cocktails.

Radio host Rich Berra of the nationally syndicated morning show The Johnjay and Rich Show was the evening’s emcee. The ’20s-themed cover band Jackie Lopez & Jazzola also entertained. The highlight of the evening was the recognition of honorary chair Dr. Dorothy Lincoln Smith, who with her husband, Harvey K. Smith, the Choir’s first artistic director, helped build the Choir into an internationally recognized, Grammy Award-winning arts organization. Gabriel Fortoul, of the Fortoul Brothers, presented Lincoln Smith with a painting that represented her role in guiding the boys in the Phoenix Boys Choir for decades.

Kristine McIver chaired the gala.

PHOTOS COURTESY PHOENIX BOYS CHOIR

Herbert Washington, Dr. Dorothy Lincoln Smith and Gabriel Fortoul

Rich Berra, emcee, and Stacey Kole

Jim and Twila Burdick

 

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