Phoenix Past Comes Alive

Heritage Square explores how Phoenix turned into a well planned city

In partnership with the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office and with help from a grant from APS, Heritage Square presents “You are Here: Mapping Early Phoenix.” The exhibition, on display in the Stevens-Haustgen Bungalow, opens Sept. 1 and runs through next summer.

Sanborn Map

Visitors will get to see Phoenix transition from a rough-around-the-edges town, which was almost called “Punkinville,” to a well planned city. With maps of early Phoenix, photos of corresponding neighborhoods and other documents, guests will see how diverse communities sprang up and how the city changed over time.

With those early maps and documents including Phoenix’s most famous map created by C. J Dyer in 1885, the show highlights the importance of community involvement over the years and how recorded documents help support the diversity of voices in the community.

Heritage Square itself is a significant reminder of the city’s vibrant Victorian past. Located on Block 14 of the original town site of Phoenix, the square dates back to the late 1800s. The restored Rosson House museum, a fully restored 1895 Queen Anne Victorian house, is its crowning jewel.

Stevens Haustgen Bungalow


You are Here: Mapping Early Phoenix

Sept. 1, 2018 – Summer 2019

Stevens-Haustgen Bungalow at Heritage Square, 113 N. 6th St., Phoenix

For more information, visit heritagesquarephx.org.

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